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  • Writer's picturejacob sciacca

Benefit of Dry Needling & Acupuncture

Dry needling and Western acupuncture have gained international recognition among healthcare professionals and continue to garner appreciation within the field of Physiotherapy as a complementary treatment for various conditions.

 

Dry needling involves the insertion of needles into altered or dysfunctional tissues to enhance or restore function, which may include targeting myofascial trigger points and periosteum.


The scientific basis of dry needling lies in its impact on neurophysiology. The penetration of the needle stimulates muscle nerve fibres, triggering a receptor response that can lead to pain inhibition through neural pathways signalling the spinal cord and brain, thus promoting analgesic effects.

 

Furthermore, needle insertion can prompt the release of endorphins, often referred to as "happy hormones," by inflammatory cells, offering local pain relief for a period of up to 2-3 days.

 

The pecking technique used in dry needling has been shown to increase local blood flow by releasing inflammatory mediators, acting as effective endogenous anti-inflammatory agents.

 

Practitioners employ clinical reasoning based on neurophysiology and technique application to achieve optimal outcomes for clients, considering factors such as purpose, diagnosis, treatment, and anatomical site.

 

The benefits of dry needling include pain reduction, promotion of healing and tissue function restoration, release of muscle trigger points, and improvement in range of motion. It can effectively address conditions such as lateral epicondylitis, Achilles/rotator cuff tendinopathy, sub-acute to chronic musculoskeletal conditions, patellofemoral and knee joint pain, radicular pain, and muscular trigger points.

 

Dry needling is a valuable therapeutic modality that can complement other treatments like strength and conditioning exercises, manual therapy, taping, and more. To experience the benefits of dry needling, book an appointment with a Physiotherapist.



 

 

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